Seeing the Food Vision Via Video

Sometimes the best way to learn about Native food systems and food-related projects is to see them in action, by way of video.  This page features several short videos of relevant projects that will be of interest to Communities, Producers and Consumers.

Our sincere thanks and appreciation to all of the tribes and organizations who allowed our video producers – Plain Depth Consulting, LLC – to interview their folks and shoot footage of their various projects.

 
Waimea Hawaiian Homesteaders' Association is a nonprofit grantee under First Nations Development Institute's Native Agriculture and Food Systems Initiative (NAFSI). First Nations' support has assisted the association's "Farming for the Working Class" project that enables Native Hawaiian homestead families to start actively farming their fallow land to grow fresh produce for themselves and the community. The program consists of hands-on farm training, paired with classroom-based learning and business training.  Funding for this project and video was generously provided by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. 
 
Sust'ainable Molokai is a nonprofit grantee under First Nations Development Institute's Native Agriculture and Food Systems Initiative (NAFSI). First Nations' support was used to launch the Molokai Food Hub, which will give the Native Hawaiian farming community better access and control over its local food system.  The Food Hub will help accurately manage orders and monitor product quality. Sust`āinable Molokai is a local, grassroots group formed to inspire youth and all Molokai residents to work toward a more sustainable future for the island. Funding for this project and video was generously provided by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. 
     
 
During the April 2014 Native Food Sovereignty Summit at the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, First Nations Development Institute asked Native food producers, farmers, ranchers, processors and others to comment on the industry.​
 
Overview of April 2014 Native Food Sovereignty Summit (2nd annual) held at the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin in Green Bay. More than 250 people attended, representing numerous tribes and organizations across the country. For the second year, the conference was sponsored by First Nations Development Institute, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin, the Intertribal Agriculture Council, and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College.
 
Participants at the 2014 Food Sovereignty Summit define "food sovereignty" in a number of ways. More than 250 people attended, representing numerous tribes and organizations across the country. For the second year, the conference was sponsored by First Nations Development Institute, the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin, the Intertribal Agriculture Council, and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College.
 
First Nations Development Institute grant-funded the Oneida Youth Entrepreneur Project in Wisconsin in 2013-2014. It involved high school students conceiving the “Very Berry Trail Mix” product, planning it, producing it, and then marketing it. Two of the students who participated, along with the project supervisor, talk about this valuable experience. It was intended to teach business and financial skills while promoting healthy eating.
 
An overview of First Nations Development Institute’s work in Native food systems, including with Santo Domingo Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo and the Institute of American Indian Arts, all in New Mexico. This video was made possible by the Comcast Foundation with additional support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.
 
In this video produced by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Mike Roberts, president of First Nations Development Institute, talks about the many opportunities for tribes to create local economies around agriculture and ways to reduce food expenses by creating community gardens and traditional food systems.
     
 
See how integrating traditional foods and medicines into treatment for addiction to alcohol and drugs helps patients at Northwest Indian Treatment Center reconnect to their culture and the land. Run by the Squaxin Island Tribe in Washington, the residential program partners with Northwest Indian College’s Traditional Plants and Foods Program. Patients leave the program with a certificate from the college, stronger cultural connections and knowledge to live a healthier future.
 
Learn how hunting and food gathering is a spiritual experience that allows Native peoples to honor the land and the sustenance it provides.  This deer-dressing demonstration, put on by Northwest Indian College during its 2012 Our Food is Our Medicine conference, hoped to motivate others to embrace traditional food gathering ways. The demonstration coincided with other native foods being cooked by traditional methods, including clams, salmon and vegetables.
     
 
Join the Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin as it honors its traditional white corn during a community-wide harvest and husking celebration.  Grown on an organic farm run by the tribe, white corn is high in protein and an important part of the traditional diet. Through its farm, orchard, cannery and educational programs, the Oneida tribe is working to build a sustainable food system and reconnect its people to traditional foods.
 
Watch tribal elders and children work together to plant seeds for a healthy future on the Santo Domingo Pueblo in New Mexico. A new greenhouse will grow fresh vegetables for elders during the wintertime and help re-establish traditional farming ways. For generations, tribes along the Rio Grande River farmed, but recent economic and other challenges have changed that. This is one example of how tribes are working to strengthen their local food systems.
     
   
Watch how a group called Apaches in the Kitchen combines traditional Native ingredients with modern culinary techniques. The team is led by Chef Nephi Craig, who also runs the Native American Culinary Association. The group gathered for its first national meeting in Sunrise, Arizona in 2012.